Scraps

“Samaya”

samaya
This illustration is directly inspired by a very enchanting performance by Sukhishvili (Georgian National Ballet), called “Samaiya”. You can read details on their English website over here, and definitely check out their other excellent performances! This is my 2nd draft — I plan to create final one on canvas with gouache using this exact colour scheme (and I’ll be meticulous with my gold leaf). Here, I used PrismaColor on Paris Paper, gold leaf, and imitation Swarovski.

Clearly, I’ve messed up on the blue gown. See how the stroke marks appear? I risked using a cheap brand blue ink there and realised that was a bad move. Later, I went over it with the same colour blue with PrismaColor, but it only made matters worse. 😦

Liszt Ferencz

franz_liszt

October 21st, 2012.

With heavy eyelids, I read midway through Bertrand Russell’s “Knowledge on Acquaintance and Knowledge by Description” to prepare for an Analytic Philosophy class. It had probably been my third time rereading the denser sections—my mission for understanding seemed arduous, and I had gone without proper sleep for several days. So in my library cubicle, I snoozed whilst a version of Antonín Dvořák’s Rusalka still played through my earphones. Soon after Der Tanz in der Dorfschenke begun to play, all the critical material I had read prior to my nap, sunk in. The material and the music, it all somehow mingled together, and the meaning of Russell’s paper clicked in my mind (or so I thought at the time).

So, I became side-tracked and looked up Liszt’s biography. It occurred to me his birthday was the next day!
Happy 201st birthday, Ferencz Liszt! Modern composers may try to replicate your original symphonies all they wish, but they will never generate a pandemic as passionately driven as Lisztomania, as you have done. Your work, Sir, flourishes to this very day, as it had over a century ago. Verily, a “Selected Symphonies of Liszt” album on iTunes would contain secondary interpretations of your music…nevertheless, any modern rendition of your original work could still catalyze creativity in any profession. And by creativity, I mean…well, this.